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20130211
20130219
STATION
KQED (PBS) 13
LANGUAGE
English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Feb 10, 2013 4:00pm PST
on our news panel tonight are paul rogers, "san jose mercury news" environment writer. peter hecht, "sacramento bee reporter" and author of "weed land" due out later this year from university of california press. and kara swisher, editor of "all things digital." well, silicon valley's economic growth is outpacing the rest of the state in terms of jobs and per capita income. posting some of the highest numbers since the recession. that according to a study released today at the annual state of the valley conference in san jose. kara, you were there with the movers and shakers in the valley. give us a sense of the mood. are people feeling good about the economy? >> it's the one part of the economy across globally that the u.s. excels in and continues to excel in, and, you know, there's been a lot of job growth in the area, a lot of innovation. some of the stocks are up, not all of them. it's a good time right now especially in an economy that has issued all over the place. >> one of the things that came out in the state of the valley report is san francisco has grown as a tech hub an
PBS
Feb 13, 2013 1:00am PST
environment to persist in 2013. >> reporter: a stronger euro makes imports of u.s. goods cheaper, and that could give some u.s. companies a boost in european sales. >> they'll get the most benefit from taking those euros that they earn abroad in europe and bringing them back home to the united states, where the currency has now become a little bit weaker. it'll have a little bit of a tailwind to their profits. >> reporter: much of the money printing in the u.s. and japan will likely pour into developing economies as investors hunt for bigger returns, but it could also inflate the currencies of those countries and create an asset bubble. >> the more monetary easing we see in the major economies, the more we are going to see a move towards interventionism and capital controls in the emerging economies. >> reporter: analysts say, come the g-20 meeting this weekend in moscow, any talk of a currency war will likely take place behind closed doors and away from the scrutiny of currency watchers. ruben ramirez, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: those tensions over foreign currencies will be
PBS
Feb 12, 2013 12:00pm PST
really structural changes in the health care environment. and we'll see where they end up. >> rose: and washington is not dealing with the issue. >> no, not candidly not well. >> rose: can't get beyond-- you know-- recently it was able to extend the meddle-- middle class tax cuts and not, tend the tax cuts for people who made $250,000 household income. >> and good but not responsive to the issue, right. the issue of whether tax rate was go up on wealthy is an interesting one. it's certainly politically charged. but it contributes over ot ten year period round number 6 to 700 billion. barely touches the issue. and so the issue didn't become how do we deal with this intermediate term crisis, it's not long term any more i believe it's intermediate term, it's how do we deal with this fiscal cliff of the moment. >> rose: and even newt gingrich said it is not the place republicans ought to make the fight because in the end they will do something. but if it doesn't happen, then people like you and others will descend on washington to force some result which will not be-- you know in the e
PBS
Feb 15, 2013 12:00pm PST
's the only choice they have for a slightly safer environment than the kids may face in the public schools that exist in their neighborhoods. but also catholic schools had been for decades the feeders of our communities to higher education. the statistics are unassailable. kids who go to catholic schools tend, a, to graduate from high school and many of our communities have disasters high school dropout rates. that's already an accomplishment. and second many of us feed into colleges thereafter. and the discipline lets us finish college as well. so i'm heartbroken by what's happening. and so sad. i have a personal reason for my sadness because i loved my grammar school and every time i've gone back in recent times to meet the kids they're all just like i was. >> rose: yes, exactly. you went from yale law school where you were an editor of the law review. you went down to new york and became a prosecutor with a legendary prosecutor here, morgenthau. do you think people are cut out to be prosecutors? >> oh, what an interesting question! there are some people and i have some friends who didn'
PBS
Feb 13, 2013 3:00pm PST
to create an environment that's friendly to firms to create jobs. >> the tax burden -- i was going to say, the tax burden on corporation is the lowest it's been in decades. >> because they're locating the jobs overseas. that's how the curve works. >> 11 european union commissioners, including the conservative finance minister of germany has signed on to the financial transaction tax. i think you're seeing an understanding of a 21st century economy and how it treats capital. not in this country, not from the republicans. but if i could just say one important thing. last night, the investment, the call for the investment in universal pre-k early education. this is an investment -- >> woodruff: yeah, i wanted to ask you both quickly to respond to that. >> any advanced country understands this is a public investment in our children, our future, and if we want to see upward mobility restored in a country that prides itself, has prided itself on that, this is one step. >> and i think this is one place where, refreshingly, we might see some bipartisan action because i think most republicans i ta
PBS
Feb 11, 2013 7:00pm PST
-- >> but how is he really going to propose a way of creating growth, creating an environment where those businesses that you talk about feel comfortable about hiring out of work americanses especially given 4lo-erjudis budget talk and everything, what you can really do? >> yeah, i think he's going to focus his attention on two areas. the first is energy development. i think he's going to make a big pitch for the u.s. as the energy power of the future, both in terms of renewable energies, green energy, and in terms of traditional energy, unconventional energy. so i think one of his themes is going to be energy. the second is i think he's going to push two very big trade bills, one the transpacific partnership with asia and the second the transatlantic partnership with the european union, both of those to create confidence that those economies are going to recover and to insurance that the united states is right in the middle serving consumers in both those countries through creating jobs, creating employment, and agricultural output here at home. >> susie: the president is also expected t
PBS
Feb 13, 2013 7:00pm PST
that to last for long. >> the environment hasn't changed for gold. i think what were looking for at the moment is a specific catalyst that drives gold to the next level. >> reporter: rhind is keeping an eye on loose monetary policy around the globe, he's thinks those policies could cause currencies to weaken, making gold an attractive alternative. he's also watching gold supplies, which are currently tight. s&p capital i.q. thinks the precious metal could rise 15% this year, ending 2013 just below $2,000 an ounce. >> price forecasts like that could benefit gold miners, toronto-based alamos gold went public today, on the new york stock exchange. c.e.o. john mcclusky says demand, drove today's listing on the big board. >> it's an indication that we've grown to a stage where we could justify listing our symbol down here and actually command some investor attention. >> reporter: there are close to 80 small gold miners, each pumping out around 200,000 ounces of gold a year, and mcclusky says that makes the sector ripe for consolidation. >> if you can get three or four mines operating under the same
PBS
Feb 11, 2013 3:00pm PST
the catholic church a safe environment for children. remember the first pope to meet with victims of sex abuse which he did for the first time in the united states in april 2008 and did six times total over the course of his papacy, the first pope to apologize directly for the crisis to institute zero tolerance as the official policy of the church. critics will say much of that was too little too late. too much was left undone but that of course is not the only issue that people will remember about this pope. many liberals in the catholic church, for example, would praise him on some fronts but suggest overall his leadership rolled back the clock on the reforming spirit of the second vatican council in the mid 1960s. many women particularly religious women in the united states, nuns, will remember the crackdowns on american nuns that unfolded on his watch. while his admirers, i submit, will probably remember him as one of the great teaching popes of modern times perhaps of all time who for almost eight years led a sort of global graduate seminar about the relationship between reason and faith
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)